How to Solve 3 of the Most Common Onboarding Problems


Onboarding is one of those subjects that’s been covered a hundred times before, but it still never gets old. Why? Because companies continue to make mistakes that can add up to tens of thousands of dollars (or more) down the road in the form of high turnover, costly mistakes, or a disenfranchised workforce. All of which are preventable – and the solution begins with the onboarding process.

Improve your onboarding process by avoiding these three big mistakes:

  1. Not setting clear expectations and job roles
  2. Not investing enough time or effort in training
  3. Failing to help new employees to integrate with company culture

    Successful onboarding
    Successful onboarding

Muddled Messages
From the moment you post an advertisement for your open position you’re shaping potential candidates impression of your business. Pay careful attention to the job description you give. Is it updated and accurate? Or has it been the same for a decade even though the position has evolved?

Make sure the educational and experience requirements you set aren’t just for bare minimum qualifications, but rather, reflect the necessary thresholds for success and thriving within the position – which may or may not be the status quo for the industry.  And throughout the interview process make sure you refer to the expectations and requirements laid out in your job listing. Getting sidetracked will make it harder to assess a candidate’s true aptitude and fit for the position.

Putting Short-Term Needs before Long-Term Success
It’s not uncommon for companies to start the hiring process when they’re already in desperate need to have the position filled and time is of the essence. Regardless of whether or not there’s a true sense of urgency, still take your time to train every new employee adequately.

Even if the person has been working in the same field for a decade or in the same position at another organization, train them on the nuances of the position within YOUR company. Doing so will help new hires understand what aspects of their job description are most important to you and set clear expectations.

Sink or Swim Environment
Every company culture is different. Dissatisfied employees who give low marks to their office culture think about looking for a new job almost 15% more often than those who have a more positive view of their company culture.

As a recruiter, there is one critically important side to this equation that we control. First, we must evaluate whether or not a candidate has the personality, experience, and other attributes to fit your existing culture.  Once hired though, you should have a plan for how you’ll integrate new employees into the culture.

Some approaches to onboarding and submersion in a company culture that work well are adequate training (as mentioned in #2). Also, using a buddy system, so the new employee has a direct line of communication with a senior employee familiar with their position, and making new hires feel welcomed by getting to know that individual and acknowledging their strengths early on.

Looking for the perfect candidate to join your firm? Contact CopperTree Staffing to learn more about our carefully selected, top-tier job seekers – some of whom are not even on the open market and work exclusively with us! Or visit our blog to learn more about employment trends, interviewing, onboarding, and employee retention.  

 

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