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IT Jobs on Track for Major Growth in 2017

With 2017 just around the corner the question on every job seeker and soon-to-be-college-grad’s mind is what do my job prospects look like for the New Year? As expected, IT careers will continue to fuel growth in the employment market with specific fields leading the way.

Overall the IT sector is predicted to grow at a rate of 22% through 2020. But certain jobs continue to be the front-runners for above average growth. If you’re still in college or thinking about a career change, these are the positions to prepare for.

IT Job Growth

Some of the hot IT jobs you can expect to see in droves next year are:

  • Web Developer 27%
  • Computer Systems Analyst 21%
  • Information Security Analyst 18%
  • Software Developer 17%

Growth Averages via BLS Occupational Outlook Handbook (2014-2024)

Web Developer

Extensive coding experience continues to be a highly sought-after skill set with all kinds of companies looking to employ their own in-house tech teams. From Google to Yahoo and corporations large and small, as a Web Developer, you shouldn’t have any trouble finding open positions.

Web Developer salaries start around $40,000 on the low end and can easily exceed $100,000 with the right combination of education and experience. The median pay rate is $87,000.

Computer Systems Analyst

As a Computer Systems Analyst, your skills at designing systems to improve efficiency and streamline processes will only continue to grow in value as competition among businesses heats up. Salaries are expected to increase

Computer Systems Analyst salaries range from approximately $55,000 to more than $165,000. The median pay rate is $69,000.

Information Security Analyst

We’re well into the digital age and the demand for comprehensive security technology and practices only continues to grow. Protecting networks and systems is an ongoing job with organizations of all sizes under the constant threat of cyber attacks.

As an Information Security Analyst, you can expect to earn between $45,000 and $135,000. The median pay rate is $69,000.

Software Developer

In the IT Field, few positions are as versatile as software development. With your skills in software design, integration, testing, and maintenance, you’ll be much in demand. As a Software Developer, you can expect to earn between $45,000 and $135,000. The median pay rate is $95,000.

Other fields with expected job growth include cloud technologies, unified communications, and online advertising technology (AdTech). Browse open IT positions or contact us to streamline your next career move.

How to Solve 3 of the Most Common Onboarding Problems


Onboarding is one of those subjects that’s been covered a hundred times before, but it still never gets old. Why? Because companies continue to make mistakes that can add up to tens of thousands of dollars (or more) down the road in the form of high turnover, costly mistakes, or a disenfranchised workforce. All of which are preventable – and the solution begins with the onboarding process.

Improve your onboarding process by avoiding these three big mistakes:

  1. Not setting clear expectations and job roles
  2. Not investing enough time or effort in training
  3. Failing to help new employees to integrate with company culture

    Successful onboarding
    Successful onboarding

Muddled Messages
From the moment you post an advertisement for your open position you’re shaping potential candidates impression of your business. Pay careful attention to the job description you give. Is it updated and accurate? Or has it been the same for a decade even though the position has evolved?

Make sure the educational and experience requirements you set aren’t just for bare minimum qualifications, but rather, reflect the necessary thresholds for success and thriving within the position – which may or may not be the status quo for the industry.  And throughout the interview process make sure you refer to the expectations and requirements laid out in your job listing. Getting sidetracked will make it harder to assess a candidate’s true aptitude and fit for the position.

Putting Short-Term Needs before Long-Term Success
It’s not uncommon for companies to start the hiring process when they’re already in desperate need to have the position filled and time is of the essence. Regardless of whether or not there’s a true sense of urgency, still take your time to train every new employee adequately.

Even if the person has been working in the same field for a decade or in the same position at another organization, train them on the nuances of the position within YOUR company. Doing so will help new hires understand what aspects of their job description are most important to you and set clear expectations.

Sink or Swim Environment
Every company culture is different. Dissatisfied employees who give low marks to their office culture think about looking for a new job almost 15% more often than those who have a more positive view of their company culture.

As a recruiter, there is one critically important side to this equation that we control. First, we must evaluate whether or not a candidate has the personality, experience, and other attributes to fit your existing culture.  Once hired though, you should have a plan for how you’ll integrate new employees into the culture.

Some approaches to onboarding and submersion in a company culture that work well are adequate training (as mentioned in #2). Also, using a buddy system, so the new employee has a direct line of communication with a senior employee familiar with their position, and making new hires feel welcomed by getting to know that individual and acknowledging their strengths early on.

Looking for the perfect candidate to join your firm? Contact CopperTree Staffing to learn more about our carefully selected, top-tier job seekers – some of whom are not even on the open market and work exclusively with us! Or visit our blog to learn more about employment trends, interviewing, onboarding, and employee retention.  

 

7 Tips to Help You Land the Job of Your Dreams

Entering the job market can be intimidating at any stage of your career. Thanks to technological advancements in communication it’s now easier than ever to find the jobs you’re interested in and apply, without ever leaving the house.

How to stand out and get the job of your dreams
How to stand out and get the job of your dreams

But technology hasn’t just revolutionized the job market for the workforce; it’s also impacted companies and the hiring process as a whole. Employers have higher expectations now than ever for incoming candidates.

Whether you are working with a recruiter, or hunting on your own, follow these seven job search tips to prepare for your entry into the job market and ace your next interview:

1.) Refresh your resume
2.) Get clear on your deal breakers
3.) Know your worth
4.) Automate your job search
5.) Brush up on your interview skills
6.) Use keywords in your application
7.) Always research the company

Shake the Dust Off Your Resume
Whatever you do, don’t forget to update your resume with your latest skills, awards, and proficiencies. It’s also a good idea to check all the dates listed and revisit your formatting and font choice if you haven’t used your resume in a few years.

Ideally, once you’re done updating it your resume will look clean and organized, and dates will appear in chronological order. Make sure your contact information is current and easy to find. Bonus points for using a sans serif font that’s easy on the eyes.

The top half of the first page of your resume be enough to stand on it’s own – objective, contact info, certifications, accomplishment highlights.  When hiring managers are under the gun, sometimes that is all they can look at before deciding to put the resume aside, or read in depth.

Know Your Deal Breakers
Everyone has their own set of deal breakers when it comes to job opportunities. Some of the most common are salary, benefits, schedule, commuting distance and title. What’s important is that you know not only what you’re looking for but also what you aren’t looking for. That way you can more quickly decide which opportunities are worth pursuing and which you should probably avoid.

Research Your Value to Employers
Knowing what your skills are worth to employers is invaluable in assessing job postings (and later down the line, job offers). Identify titles you’re interested in and qualified for and then do a little research to determine average compensation and how your experience level and education stack up.

A recruiter in your field can go a long way in letting you know what the current market is for your skills, and typical recent offers.

Set Up Automatic Alerts for New Jobs
While it’s best to remain active in your job search, no matter how long it takes, it’s also handy to use the tools available. If you’re using platforms like Indeed or Monster, you can save your searches and set alerts, so you’ll be notified when a new job that matches your criteria is posted.

Practice Your Interview Skills
Of course, research most common interview questions for candidates in your field and practice your responses to both generic and technical questions. But don’t forget to also brush up on reading body language (and how mirroring it can benefit you).

Become an Application Jedi
Every resume and cover letter you send should be tweaked to fit the position you’re applying for as well as the particular company. By learning to pay attention to keywords in job postings, you can add an extra layer of customization and stand out to potential employers.  Job titles in IT can vary quite a bit for the same function, so it is important to relate your past experience to the current opportunity as closely as possible.

Prep for the Interview Every Time
Being contacted for an interview can be exciting, but don’t get so caught up in the moment that you under prepare. Even if you’re more than qualified, remember the interview is like a sales call. You’re selling this company on why they should hire you and not someone else. And like a great sales person, you have to understand what they need before you can convince them you are the solution, so ask good questions.

Make sure that you research the position, the company, and if possible, the interviewer before you meet them. LinkedIn is great for finding out about both the company and the interviewer.

That way you can clearly articulate how you meet not only the job qualifications but also fit with their company culture and already understand their brand and values.

For the most streamlined job search, work with the professionals like the team at CopperTree Staffing. Get more job search tips, info on employment trends, and find out what employers are looking for on our blog.

The Best Way to Interview an Engineer


The internet is rife with jokes about how engineers are different from regular people in the way they think, act, and communicate. You might brush some of these memes and parodies of advice off as lighthearted fun, but as is the case with most contemporary humor, there’s a little truth in jest.

Engineer interviewing
Make the most of your time when interviewing engineers

When it comes to how they behave and think, engineers are unique. They’re puzzle solvers and solution finders. They don’t ask “can I fix this problem,” they ask “how will I fix this problem.” And that’s exactly why they’re so valuable in the professional realm. We need intelligent minds that see opportunities where others see obstacles.

But there’s another side to the uber-practical-coin that is the engineer’s mind; they also don’t usually interview like an officer worker, executive, or other people-focused employees. So the question becomes, what’s the best way to interview an engineer?

WHEN YOU INTERVIEW AN ENGINEER:

  1. Don’t Skim over the Technical Details of the Job
  2. Leave Marketing Lingo Out of It
  3. Don’t Waste Time on Nuance and Fluff

Don’t Skim over the Technical Details of the Job
The number one rule for engaging an engineer and making sure you’re both on the same page when it comes to what your company is looking for and whether or not the engineer being interviewed is the right person for the job is don’t skim over the technical details of the position.

Candidates in other areas may thrive on touchy, feely language and artful descriptions that could double as an advertisement, but engineers are practical people. They need detailed technical information and specs to evaluate the job at hand and whether or not they’re qualified to meet your demands for the position.

Leave Marketing Lingo Out of It
Second, don’t fill the interview with marketing lingo. Industry jargon as it relates to the job is fine, but those fancy words that the marketing team has created to sell the end service to users or communicate with the public at large have no place in an engineer’s interview. Stick with industry terminology and layman’s terms that everyone will recognize. That will help keep communication clear and avoid potential confusion.

Don’t Waste Time on Nuance and Fluff
Lastly, every candidate deserves a warm welcome. With engineers, it’s best to be brief (but still sincere) and then spend the bulk of your time together describing the job, discussing technical specifications, and your expectations for the work. Of course, engineers are people, not machines, but you only have so much time allocated for interviews. Spending too much time on social nuance and fluff to the detriment of detailed, job-specific requirements is an inefficient use of your initial meeting.

Contact CopperTree Staffing to explore career opportunities in your field or visit our blog to learn more about IT employment trends, interviewing, on boarding, and more.